Review: The Mouth of the Dark by Tim Waggoner

the mouth of the dark by tim waggoner cover
© Flame Tree Press, 2018.

Synopsis:


Jayce’s twenty-year-old daughter Emory is missing, lost in a dark, dangerous realm called Shadow that exists alongside our own reality. An enigmatic woman named Nicola guides Jayce through this bizarre world, and together they search for Emory, facing deadly dog-eaters, crazed killers, homicidal sex toys, and – worst of all – a monstrous being known as the Harvest Man. But no matter what Shadow throws at him, Jayce won’t stop. He’ll do whatever it takes to find his daughter, even if it means becoming a worse monster than the things that are trying to stop him. FLAME TREE PRESS is the new fiction imprint of Flame Tree Publishing. Launching in 2018 the list brings together brilliant new authors and the more established; the award winners, and exciting, original voices.

Via Goodreads

Review:


The Mouth of the Dark is the second book by Tim Waggoner that I’ve read and, after completing it, I’m pretty convinced I’ll like just about any of his work. Waggoner is imaginative and original, and The Mouth of the Dark takes readers to an entirely new world of monstrosities. It’s easily one of the most fantastic books I’ve read this year.

Jayce Lewis’s daughter has gone missing. No one’s seen her and in pursuit of her whereabouts, Jayce stumbles upon a world known as Shadow. Shadow is a dangerous place where nightmares are reality and with the help of a woman named Nicola, Jayce quickly discovers finding out what happened to his daughter isn’t going to be easy. The pair encounter several awesome creatures on their journey, some harmless and others not so much.

Nicola is a fairly likable character and I don’t have a whole lot to say about her. Jayce, on the other hand, has serious mommy issues–which you’ll see if you read the book. Though I didn’t really enjoy the flashbacks, Waggoner does a great job of filling Jayce out. By the end of the book, you know him pretty well.

The plot is a bit slow, and this is perhaps because of the time Waggoner spends detailing Shadow. I’m okay with this, as it’s an amazing ecosystem of horror. For the most part it is pretty straightforward, though the tenses do switch during the flashbacks. I found this to be mildly distracting, but overall it did not detract from the book.

The Mouth of the Dark is a great read and I highly recommend it to those who are into true horror. It is riddled with terror and depravity and there are some parts of the book that may make the squeamish uncomfortable. It’s definitely a title I’m glad to have on my shelf.

I’d like to thank Flame Tree Press for providing me with a free copy for the purpose of unbiased review.

Rating: 💀💀💀💀